Featured

DIY Mei Tai Pattern

Posted by on Jan 26, 2014 in Featured, mei tai pattern | 49 comments

DIY Mei Tai Pattern

This is a DIY Mei Tai Pattern with padded to wrap straps, an attached hood, neck padding, leg padding, and an internal adjustable system that makes this adjustable for a small baby up to about 4 years old. The entire series is 19 pages, including material lists and step-by-step instructions and images. You don’t have to use a woven wrap to make this. I made the “Minnie Mouse” inspired Mei Tai out of stretch denim and some cheap decorative cotton. It is just as comfortable as my woven wrap conversion, although not quite as breathable. The hood curve is similar to the hood of an Obimama in that it curves up instead of down, but if you would like a downward curve, or no curve, you can easily change it. The rest of the pattern is basic, freehand drawn by me and then straightened up on the computer by my husband, and looks to me like pretty much any mei tai with a separate waist. Note – If you have enough fabric you can tape the waist pattern onto the body and cut it out as one solid piece. Here is the pattern: Waist Hood Body. These will print out on standard printer paper, and then you will need to trim some edges and assemble the pieces. Each pattern has a one inch square on it so you know if it printed out at the right size. You MUST SAVE the pattern, then open it in Adobe Reader and PRINT AS A POSTER. There is a little button on the print page that lets you do that when you print from Adobe. If you just click on the pattern and try to print it from your internet browser, it won’t print correctly. These are NOT all the pieces in the Mei Tai. There are rectangular pieces that you also have to make yourself – these are described in a list on the following pages as “Additional Patterns”. This is a toddler sized Mei Tai. Some people specifically made this for their young baby and printed it out at 85-90%. I do not currently have a small baby to test this out on, so I have used a Cabbage Patch doll. I made this Mei Tai so that I could use it with my 1.5+ year old, my 3.5+ year old, and any future babies that I or a friend might have. This pattern is free for personal use only. I do not give license to sell this pattern. I do not make any representations about the suitability or safety of this pattern. It is for your educational use as you design your own DIY Mei Tai. I do not make Mei Tais for sale. I have never owned or even seen a Mei Tai that someone else has made. I only have my own two DIY Mei Tais. I cobbled this pattern together from careful examination of other DIY Mei Tai blog posts, and photographs of Mei Tais from many makers. I have added an internal adjustable system, which is my own design and is based off of adjusting my kids’ pants all the time. Here are links to some of what I looked at to put this together (I looked at many more sites than this but it’s impossible to remember all of them): Blogs/DIY Sites: WrapMeiTai, Hipababy, ThoseMartins, Jan Andrea’s FrankenKozy, HoboMamal, A Fuller Day, Fine and Fair, BecomingMamas.  Commercial Makers (You can contact these people, not me, if you want someone to sew you a carrier): Topatop, ObiMama, Ocah, ZanyToes, OpiTai, Wearababy, Bamberoo, Madame GooGoo, Kanaluti, and Earthy Bliss I would always use sturdy fabric – like wrap fabric or a sturdy bottomweight fabric. I used ½...

Read More

The Solution

Posted by on Dec 13, 2013 in Diary of a Startup, Featured | 0 comments

The Solution

They say a good idea solves a problem. “Think of a problem and solve it,” they say. I knew the problem well, since I live it, but coming up with a workable solution was something that evolved over time – five years of time, and counting. At first, I thought I’d just create much better training for the clinic. Then I thought, “I can create good training, and then I can create some really excellent training and I can sell it.” My husband does web development for a living, and I absorbed enough from watching him that I was able to figure out a lot. I bought Adobe Captivate and made some training programs for the clinic. Nothing great, they were just my first attempts at it. They were a lot better than what we had, and they were available to watch on the internet. I created one and used it with an audience, and they liked it. I created one for training intake volunteers and gave a few the link to my private website, and they liked it. Nothing ever came from it after that. I thought, “Well, I’ll just create a website where I make these and sell these to people. These could be awesome training programs.” Then I thought, “Well, I’ll get some other lawyers to write content for some training, and I’ll turn them into more programs and we can work on getting CLE credit for people who go through them. Lawyers can make money that way.” I still think this is a great idea, and I’d like to do it some day, but for now it is prohibitively expensive. Finally, after a lot of work, I found a practical way to help the volunteer attorneys (a lot of them are also new attorneys), and a way to help the organizations that help pro bono legal representation. I talked to a lot of people, read a lot of reports, and went to a lot of meetings, and studied a lot of other companies during this stage. The amount of work that this has taken….I cannot even describe, except in painstaking detail, I guess. That’s when I decided to finally have the site built. However, there are a lot of details in all the steps from the beginning of the idea to the beginning of building the website. When I was still thinking that I wanted I had my husband start working on fixing up one program that I did on U Visas (one of the immigration-related applications of which I have done many hundreds). I wanted it to be to the level of being pretty good, like the programs that he works on. My husband didn’t do it. I bugged him to work on it. He sort of worked on it. He got bored. It was taking a long time. It kept taking a long time. My husband works hard and he works some long hours, and I was bugging him to do this after work, and he was tired. I also was working full time, and trying to do this after work, and I was pregnant with my third child and often very sick, and I do not have anywhere near the skill level he does with Captivate. Then I had a new baby, and my oldest child hadn’t started kindergarten yet. There was no way to work on complicated programs while also maintaining a full time job and taking care of a family. This was a good idea, but not one that I could make work. I needed a simpler solution – one...

Read More